My Visit To the Hancock House

The Hancock House has been written about time and time again, so I’m not going to write a book here.  Only to say, if you haven’t checked this place out or know about it, you should.  It’s a great historic site of South Jersey History and is a New Jersey State Historic Site.

It's the start of the adventure!

It’s the start of the adventure!

Salem County fresh!

Salem County fresh!

 

Beautiful stops along the way!

Beautiful stops along the way!

 

 

Another Flemish Bond beauty right outside of Salem.

Another Flemish Bond beauty right outside of Salem.

And.. we're here and made it!

And.. we’re here and made it!

 

The view near the Hancock House.

The view near the Hancock House.

I’ll just give you a bit of the background about it.

Judge William Hancock built this structure in 1734.  On its side, flaunts its very fanciful Flemish bond design.  It has stately initials “W” and “S” for William and Sarah.  The site is most famous for the Hancock’s Bridge massacre in 1778.

Commemorative Plaque.

Commemorative Plaque.

The Hancock House.

The Hancock House.

Side view.

Side view.

 

British troops, on the orders of Officer John Graves Simcoe, crossed nearby Alloway Creek on the early morning hours of March 21, 1778.  They surprised members of the local American militia who were stationed at this home. The British officer’s orders were to “spare no one.” The home was taken over by Patriots and William Hancock, the owner (and even according to reports were Loyalists and were supporters of the crown), had returned to his home and was killed via bayonet.  Twenty lives of the Salem County Militia were also lost that day, including William’s brother. Some even attempted to surrender, but they still killed them anyway!

 

This tree is majestic.

This tree is majestic.

 

 

Some info on the Flemish Bond styled homes that are found all over South Jersey.

Some info on the Flemish Bond styled homes that are found all over South Jersey.

The cabin on the Hancock property.

The cabin on the Hancock property.

This building at the Hancock House site is a rebuilt (1931) Swedish Log Cabin using 400 year old lumber salvaged from the John Tyler property in Salem. The cabin was placed on the original site of were the original building once stood.  It is a rare example of hand-hewn, white cedar plank construction typically used in the seventeenth century.

 

As you can see, it is an interesting place of history.  I was not able to go on a tour because I visited the Hancock house on the off-season. I hope to return and visit again this year.

 

Until our next adventure, my friends!

 

The Yummygal

 

PS. I am having a sign-up of photography classes soon to where we go out to certain sites and we take photographs (a small fee). These classes are for folks that want to practice and get better at photography or perhaps want to learn more about their camera.  Classes will start in the beginning of April.  More info can be found on my photography business page!  http://shootingstarsouthjersey.com/

It’s a great way to get out and meet folks who are interested in taking better photos and to meet other folks who have an interest in exploring and history.

Hope to see you then!

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