Malaga Lake- Where I’d Like To Cook A Nice Juicy Steak

The Mighty Malaga

 

Malaga Lake Park an easily reachable 227 acre esplanade on the tributary of the Maurice River.
Generations have enjoyed the soft sandy beach along the lake for a splash of summer excitement and relief from the scorching humid heat.

The origin of Malaga is accredited both to early glass workers, which were illustrious in the area, but also from the Spanish city of Malaga and the planting of Malaga Grapes. The soil in the area is magnifico for growing grapes.

20130509-165952.jpg

The magnificent Malaga

20130509-170048.jpg

Scotland Run that runs on the other side of the lake via the damseling dam

Malaga Lake is not a natural lake. A Dam was created over a century ago, using small bubbling streams from the Maurice River. The land was once a sprawling farmstead. Now, the lake is 105 acres of winsomeness.

20130509-165418.jpg

Park Entrance

Talk oak trees still line the surroundings of the lake. In 1873, the West Jersey Camp Meeting ground was formed. It eventually became known as Malaga Camp. Methodists flocked from surrounding towns to spend their vacation on more than 100 cozy cottages along the periphery.

20130509-165325.jpg

Malaga Lake Chapel

20130509-165532.jpg

Cute cottages

Malaga Lake park offers a nature junkies dream of fishing, swimming, bird watching, bbq stations and boating. Woodland trails surround this luscious body of water.

20130509-165628.jpg

The Tabernacle

This is one of Franklin Township’s swanky basins of beauty. I think almost all the folks of South Jersey have probably visited in their lifetime. Oh and a bald eagle has recently been spotted here.

Until our next adventure, my friends! -The Yummygal

7 thoughts on “Malaga Lake- Where I’d Like To Cook A Nice Juicy Steak

  1. Oh my, another place from my childhood. I went to Malaga Camp several years as a child. Most vivid memory was that the lake was drained one year (saw nothing but stumps) and they bused us to another lake to swim. Funny – don’t remember what lake that was. This must have been around 1955. Also, remember eating lunch each day in the dining hall. Bologna sandwiches and applesauce.

  2. I’ve seen a sign for Malaga Camp from RT 55, but never checked out Malaga Lake. With my unconditional fascination of nature, wildlife, lakes & streams…this will have to be a stop for me, on top of other similiar areas you had posted.

  3. scotland tributary looks a little like…. b witch moovy!
    but if you’re having fun (which it definitely seems you usually do), we’re having fun reading about it!

  4. There used to be a Girl Scout (day) Camp just north of the current playground area, in the woods. It was called Molia Day Camp after Molia Farms which was (I believe) what the area was called back then. I attended the GS camp about 1958-1959. I leaned how to swim in Malaga Lake which had a roped-off area just for the use of the Girl Scout camp in the summer. We didn’t have actual tents for sleeping, but there were covered areas with tables underneath where we did crafts & ate the lunches that we brought from home each day. We would have to keep these areas immaculate as we were competing against other groups of Girl Scouts for the reward of having the cleanest “campsite”. I have driven past this area so many times in my life & I have always wanted to take a walk through the woods to see the place where this camp used to be. I’m sure that after almost 55 yrs. that it is totally overgrown & looks nothing of how I remember it being.

  5. We moved to Malaga in 1957 and found the lake and had a great time swimming and fishing. We came from south Philadelphia . Times where bad there and dad said its time to leave. My brother and I loved to explore the lake and it woods around it. We made good friends with the people who I watched there homes being built. Frost lakes was the name of our project . Ours house was one of the first there.

Comments are welcome! Share your love and knowledge of South Jersey.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s